How to craft a killer personal brand statement

woman waiting outside an office

It’s the elevator pitch that tells recruiters and networkers what you’ve got to offer in a handy nutshell. Here’s how to get it right…  

In a world that’s overflowing with information, it pays to make yourself memorable. Your personal brand statement helps to do just that. For example:

  • Industry-accredited software developer with 7 years’ experience developing apps and tools for award-winning fintech enterprises 

  • ACCA-qualified accountant specialising in creative SMEs, who really enjoys using her professional skills to support the entrepreneurial culture of start-ups and smaller companies

How to structure your personal brand statement

Personal mission statements tend to follow a simple formula: 

  • ‘[I am] an X with Y looking to do Z’

X sums up what you do, ideally with some sort of credential or proof point attached e.g. ‘industry-accredited’ or ‘highly experienced’ or ‘bilingual’.

Y relates to your experience and the sort of value you offer e.g. ‘with 5 years’ experience in negotiating merger & acquisition deals in the retail sector’.

Z is what you’re looking for next, again ideally also framed as a benefit to your potential audience e.g ‘looking to translate my proven business development skills into effective fundraising initiatives in the non-profit sector’.

Top tips to stand out

  • Every word in your statement is taking up valuable real estate. There’s no room for repetition or ambiguity.

  • Remember what your statement isn’t: It’s not your mission statement for life, a statement of your dream job, or a personal mantra. Keep it business-like and professional.

  • Does your statement feel easy and natural to say? Does it make sense out of context? Does it flow smoothly or do you trip up on certain words or phrases? Practise your statement on family friends. 

  • Try to avoid clichéd words and phrases like ‘passionate’, ‘results-driven’, ‘self-motivated and energetic’, ‘highly organised’ and ‘detail-oriented’. These tend to get overlooked as they’re quite generic and rather over-used. Instead, go for phrases that add value and concrete detail e.g. ‘Recent MBA with…’ or ‘Python-fluent developer with…’ or ‘Treasury-qualified financial officer with…’  

Keep it fresh

As with the rest of your CV, it’s a good idea to regularly revisit your statement, and update it as your skills, experience and aspirations change. Likewise, be prepared to tweak it to make it more relevant for different jobs you apply for. 

Are you a ready for your next move? Check out the opportunities available at Resource Solutions.